Antiemetic efficacy of the neurokinin‐1 antagonist, aprepitant, plus a 5HT3 antagonist and a corticosteroid in patients receiving anthracyclines or cyclophosphamide in addition to high‐dose cisplatin

@article{Gralla2005AntiemeticEO,
  title={Antiemetic efficacy of the neurokinin‐1 antagonist, aprepitant, plus a 5HT3 antagonist and a corticosteroid in patients receiving anthracyclines or cyclophosphamide in addition to high‐dose cisplatin},
  author={Richard J Gralla and Ronald de Wit and J{\o}rn Herrstedt and Alexandra D. Carides and Juliana Ianus and J. Guoguang-Ma and Judith K. Evans and Kevin J. Horgan},
  journal={Cancer},
  year={2005},
  volume={104}
}
The tendency of chemotherapeutic regimens to cause vomiting is dependent on the individual drugs in the regimen. The authors analyzed data combined from 2 Phase III trials to assess the effect of the neurokinin‐1 (NK1) antagonist aprepitant combined with a 5HT3 antagonist plus a corticosteroid in a subpopulation receiving > 1 emetogenic chemotherapeutic agent. 
The neurokinin1 receptor antagonist aprepitant as an antiemetic for moderately emetogenic chemotherapy
  • D. Warr
  • Biology
    Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy
  • 2006
TLDR
Aprepitant should now also be considered to be part of prophylactic antiemetic therapy for women who receive chemotherapy that contains an anthracycline and cyclophosphamide.
Single-dose fosaprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting associated with moderately emetogenic chemotherapy: results of a randomized, double-blind phase III trial†
TLDR
Adding a single dose of fosaprepitant to a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and corticosteroid in a nonanthracycline and cyclophosphamide-based moderately emetogenic chemotherapy population significantly improved the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.
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TLDR
GERSC, the most recently approved 5HT3-RA formulation, is indicated for use with other antiemetics to prevent acute and delayed nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of MEC and anthracycline–cyclophosphamide combination-chemotherapy regimens.
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TLDR
Oral aprepitant was effective in the prevention of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) associated with single or multiple cycles of highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) and when combined with a corticosteroid and 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist is a recommended regimen for the treatment of CINV.
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TLDR
There were no clinically relevant differences in toxicity by adding aprepitant and improvements in the quality of life of patients on chemotherapy were recorded.
Randomized, placebo‐controlled, pilot study evaluating aprepitant single dose plus palonosetron and dexamethasone for the prevention of acute and delayed chemotherapy‐induced nausea and vomiting
TLDR
The purpose of this pilot study was to ascertain the effectiveness of 1‐day versus 3‐day aprepitant in the prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting in patients who were receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy.
Fosaprepitant (MK-0517): a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting
  • R. Navari
  • Medicine, Biology
    Expert opinion on investigational drugs
  • 2007
TLDR
Further study is needed to clarify the use of fosaprepitant for the prevention of CINV, and to clarify optimal dosing regimens that may be appropriate substitutes for oral aprepitant.
Palonosetron with aprepitant plus dexamethasone to prevent chemotherapy‐induced nausea and vomiting during gemcitabine/cisplatin in urothelial cancer patients
To evaluate the appearance of chemotherapy‐induced nausea and vomiting, and to compare the antiemetic efficacy of the triple combination of palonosetron, aprepitant and dexamethasone with that of our
Clinical pharmacology of neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy
TLDR
Five NK-1 RA formulations are commercially available to treat the delayed phase of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) occurring between days 2–5 post chemotherapy but no direct comparative studies have been conducted to determine their relative clinical utility.
Recent developments in the clinical pharmacology of rolapitant: subanalyses in specific populations
TLDR
Recent post hoc analyses of clinical trial data demonstrate that rolapitant is efficacious in the control of CINV in patient populations with specific tumor types, namely, breast cancers, gastrointestinal/colorectal cancers, and lung cancers and the safety profile of ro Lapitant in these specific patient populations was consistent with that observed in primary analyses of phase 3 trials.
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