Antidepressant treatment and emotional processing: can we dissociate the roles of serotonin and noradrenaline?

@article{Pringle2013AntidepressantTA,
  title={Antidepressant treatment and emotional processing: can we dissociate the roles of serotonin and noradrenaline?},
  author={Abbie Pringle and Ciara McCabe and Philip J. Cowen and Catherine J. Harmer},
  journal={Journal of Psychopharmacology},
  year={2013},
  volume={27},
  pages={719 - 731}
}
The ability to match individual patients to tailored treatments has the potential to greatly improve outcomes for individuals suffering from major depression. In particular, while the vast majority of antidepressant treatments affect either serotonin or noradrenaline or a combination of these two neurotransmitters, it is not known whether there are particular patients or symptom profiles which respond preferentially to the potentiation of serotonin over noradrenaline or vice versa. Experimental… Expand
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