Anticonvulsant effects of localized chronic infusions of GABA in cortical and reticular structures of baboons.

Abstract

We studied the effects of chronic (7 day) infusions of GABA (100 and 20 micrograms/microliter, 10 microliter/h) applied in different cerebral structures of baboons made photosensitive by a subconvulsant dose of allylglycine. The GABA infusion has partial anticonvulsant effects when applied to the motor cortex, reticular magnocellular nucleus (RMC), or substantia nigra (SN), but when directed to the prefrontal cortex (area 8) it has no effect. These anticonvulsant effects of GABA infusion are more important when GABA is infused into the motor cortex, where paroxysmal discharges (PDs) originate, than when it is infused into the RMC. In contrast, the anticonvulsant effects on light-induced generalized seizures are more pronounced when GABA is infused into the RMC than when it is infused into the motor cortex. GABA infusion into the SN has no effect on PDs and myoclonia and blocks seizures less effectively than the RMC infusion. These results are in accordance with the role of the motor cortex as a generator of PDs and of RMC in the generalization of seizures. Focal paroxysmal EEG and clinical activities, previously reported to appear at the end of the motor cortex GABA infusion, were not observed after RMC or SN infusions. However, behavioral hyperactivity occurring at the end of subcortical GABA infusions was observed. These behavioral signs could correspond to the clinical expression of a GABA withdrawal syndrome.

Cite this paper

@article{SilvaBarrat1988AnticonvulsantEO, title={Anticonvulsant effects of localized chronic infusions of GABA in cortical and reticular structures of baboons.}, author={Carmen Silva-Barrat and Sim{\'o}n Brailowsky and D A Riche and Ch. Menini}, journal={Experimental neurology}, year={1988}, volume={101 3}, pages={418-27} }