Anticoagulant Exposure and Notoedric Mange in Bobcats and Mountain Lions in Urban Southern California

@inproceedings{Riley2007AnticoagulantEA,
  title={Anticoagulant Exposure and Notoedric Mange in Bobcats and Mountain Lions in Urban Southern California},
  author={Seth P. D. Riley and Cassity Bromley and R. Poppenga and Francisco A. Uzal and Lynn Whited and Raymond M. Sauvajot},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract Humans introduce many toxicants into the environment, the long-term and indirect effects of which are generally unknown. We investigated exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides and evaluated the association between notoedric mange, an ectoparasitic disease, and anticoagulant exposure in bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) in a fragmented urban landscape in southern California, USA. Beginning in 2002, an epizootic of notoedric mange, a disease previously reported only… 
Anticoagulant rodenticides in urban bobcats: exposure, risk factors and potential effects based on a 16-year study
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A strong association between certain levels of exposure (ppm) and between multiple AR exposure events, and notoedric mange is found, and ARs pose a substantial threat to bobcats, and likely other mammalian and avian predators, living at the urban-wildland interface.
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Sublethal AR exposure, primarily measured as exposure to diphacinone, is associated with hallmark indicators of generalized systemic inflammation that in persistence could promote immune dysfunction and explain the link between AR exposure and mange vulnerability.
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Abstract Exposure of nontarget wildlife to anticoagulant rodenticides (AR) is a global conservation concern typically centered around urban or agricultural areas. Recently, however, the illegal use
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A 15-year study of carnivores in an urban landscape in southern California has revealed a high incidence of exposure of non-target wildlife to anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs). All carnivore species
Anticoagulant rodenticide exposure in an Australian predatory bird increases with proximity to developed habitat.
  • M. Lohr
  • Medicine, Biology
    The Science of the total environment
  • 2018
TLDR
The results suggest that AR exposure poses a serious threat to native predators in Australia, particularly in species using urban and peri-urban areas and species with large home ranges.
Anticoagulant Rodenticide Exposure and Toxicosis in Coyotes in the Denver Metropolitan Area
Anticoagulant rodenticides are widely used in urban areas to control rodent pests and are responsible for secondary poisoning in many nontarget wildlife species. We tested the livers of five coyotes
Anticoagulant rodenticide brodifacoum detected in dead nestlings of an insectivorous passerine
TLDR
The first apparent case of secondary brodifacoum exposure and subsequent poisoning in nestlings of an insectivorous passerine, the Stewart Island robin (Petroica australis rakiura), and the potential role of invertebrates as vectors of anticoagulant rodenticides in the environment are highlighted.
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