Anticholinergic toxicity associated with lupin seed ingestion: case report

@article{Grande2004AnticholinergicTA,
  title={Anticholinergic toxicity associated with lupin seed ingestion: case report},
  author={A. Di Grande and R. Paradiso and Salvatore Amico and Giovanni Fulco and Bruno Fantauzza and Paola Noto},
  journal={European Journal of Emergency Medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={11},
  pages={119-120}
}
We describe a case of acute poisoning in a 51-year-old female patient who presented to the Emergency Department with weakness, anxiety, dry mouth, bilateral mydriasis and lid drop. In differential diagnosis, botulism, Guillain–Barré syndrome and myasthenia gravis were considered, as well as cerebral haematoma because of a cranial injury a week before. Symptoms, which resolved within 12 h without any therapy, were instead related to the ingestion of lupin seeds. 
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TLDR
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TLDR
The QA contents were particularly low in protein isolates and in foods containing these ingredients, indicating that their use is a very effective tool for keeping low the daily intake of QAs.
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