Anti-predator benefits of group living in white-nosed coatis (Nasua narica)

@article{Hass2002AntipredatorBO,
  title={Anti-predator benefits of group living in white-nosed coatis (Nasua narica)},
  author={Christine C. Hass and David Valenzuela},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={51},
  pages={570-578}
}
Abstract. Predation is often considered an important factor in the evolution of sociality among animals. We studied mortality patterns and grouping behavior of white-nosed coatis (Nasua narica) at sites in southern Arizona, USA, and western Jalisco, México. Coatis were monitored by radio-tracking and recaptures for more than 3 years at each site. In both populations, predation by large felids, including jaguars (Panthera onca) and pumas (Puma concolor), accounted for more than 50% of mortality… Expand

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