Anti-citrullinated peptide antibody-negative RA is a genetically distinct subset: a definitive study using only bone-erosive ACPA-negative rheumatoid arthritis

@inproceedings{Ohmura2010AnticitrullinatedPA,
  title={Anti-citrullinated peptide antibody-negative RA is a genetically distinct subset: a definitive study using only bone-erosive ACPA-negative rheumatoid arthritis},
  author={Koichiro Ohmura and Chikashi Terao and Etsuko Maruya and Masaki Katayama and Kenichiro Matoba and Kota Shimada and Akira Murasawa and Shigeru Honjo and Kiyoshi Takasugi and Shigeto Tohma and Keitaro Matsuo and Kazuo Tajima and Naoichiro Yukawa and Daisuke Kawabata and Takaki Nojima and Takao Fujii and Ryo Yamada and Hiroo Saji and Fumihiko Matsuda and Tsuneyo Mimori},
  booktitle={Rheumatology},
  year={2010}
}
OBJECTIVES ACPA is a highly specific marker for RA. It was recently reported that ACPA can be used to classify RA into two disease subsets, ACPA-positive and ACPA-negative RA. ACPA-positive RA was found to be associated with the HLA-DR shared epitope (SE), but ACPA negative was not. However, the suspicion remained that this result was caused by the ACPA-negative RA subset containing patients with non-RA diseases. We examined whether this is the case even when possible non-RA ACPA-negative RA… CONTINUE READING