Anti-Japanese activities in North Borneo before World War Two, 1937–1941

@article{Tzeken2001AntiJapaneseAI,
  title={Anti-Japanese activities in North Borneo before World War Two, 1937–1941},
  author={Danny Wong Tze-ken},
  journal={Journal of Southeast Asian Studies},
  year={2001},
  volume={32},
  pages={93 - 106}
}
  • Danny Wong Tze-ken
  • Published 1 February 2001
  • History, Economics
  • Journal of Southeast Asian Studies
Anti-Japanese activities in North Borneo before the Pacific War were part of a larger anti-Japanese campaign waged by the Chinese in Southeast Asia. In North Borneo one of the most important outcomes was politicisation of the Chinese community. During this period the North Borneo Company, which had previously welcomed Japanese capital and labour, also began to take steps to curb Japanese activities in the state. 
1 Citations
More Bitter Than Sweet: Reflecting on the Japanese Community in British North Borneo, 1885–1946
In the city center of Tawau in Sabah, Eastern Malaysia, stands a little belfry.1 It was built in 1921 by the local Japanese community to commemorate the restoration of peace after World War I. Sabah

References

SHOWING 1-8 OF 8 REFERENCES
CO 968/15/2. 53 Governor, Straits Settlements, to CO
    NBSF 909. For examples of these activities, see BNBH
      Secretary and Governor, No. 00412/2,'Report on the Disturbances in Sacred Heart School Jesselton in Connection with the Manner of Contributing to the Chinese Red Cross Fund'; and Resident
      • Minutes by Govt
      One of those who served in this manner was Chin Shi Siew, the former senior assistant in the Chung Hwa Primary School in Sandakan. See Shandagen Zhonghua Shanghui
        Straits Settlements, to Secretary of State for Colonies
          According to a report compiled by the Nanyang Chinese National Salvation Movement, the average monthly collection from British Borneo and Siam was around $
            CO 968/15/2. The Security Branch enlisted the services of Dr Lee Sah Chee, a government official fluent in the Japanese language, to censor the mail
            • Lee was killed by the Japanese military on 27 May 1945 in a crackdown on Allied sympathisers in Sandakan. 55 Governor
            The regulation exempted Allied European races and native-born citizens of the state belonging to any race indigenous to North Borneo