Anthropogenic electromagnetic noise disrupts magnetic compass orientation in a migratory bird

@article{Engels2014AnthropogenicEN,
  title={Anthropogenic electromagnetic noise disrupts magnetic compass orientation in a migratory bird},
  author={Svenja Engels and Nils-Lasse Schneider and Nele Lefeldt and Christine Maira Hein and Manuela Zapka and Andreas Michalik and Dana Elbers and Achim Kittel and P. J. Hore and Henrik Mouritsen},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2014},
  volume={509},
  pages={353-356}
}
Electromagnetic noise is emitted everywhere humans use electronic devices. For decades, it has been hotly debated whether man-made electric and magnetic fields affect biological processes, including human health. So far, no putative effect of anthropogenic electromagnetic noise at intensities below the guidelines adopted by the World Health Organization has withstood the test of independent replication under truly blinded experimental conditions. No effect has therefore been widely accepted as… Expand
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TLDR
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