Anthropogenic disturbance induces opposing population trends in spotted hyenas and African lions

@article{Green2017AnthropogenicDI,
  title={Anthropogenic disturbance induces opposing population trends in spotted hyenas and African lions},
  author={D. Scott Green and Lily Johnson-Ulrich and H. E. Couraud and Kay E. Holekamp},
  journal={Biodiversity and Conservation},
  year={2017},
  volume={27},
  pages={871-889}
}
Large carnivore populations are declining worldwide due to direct and indirect conflicts with humans. Protected areas are critical for conserving large carnivores, but increasing human-wildlife conflict, tourism, and human population growth near these sanctuaries may have negative effects on the carnivores within sanctuary borders. Our goals were to investigate how anthropogenic disturbance along the edge of the Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, influences the demography and space-use of two… 

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