Anthrax as a biological weapon, 2002: updated recommendations for management.

@article{Inglesby2002AnthraxAA,
  title={Anthrax as a biological weapon, 2002: updated recommendations for management.},
  author={Thomas V Inglesby and Tara O'Toole and Donald Ainslie Henderson and John G. Bartlett and Michael S. Ascher and Edward M. Eitzen and Arthur M. Friedlander and Julie Louise Gerberding and Jerome Hauer and James M. Hughes and Joseph McDade and Michael T. Osterholm and Gerald W. Parker and Trish M. Perl and Philip K. Russell and Kevin Tonat},
  journal={JAMA},
  year={2002},
  volume={287 17},
  pages={
          2236-52
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To review and update consensus-based recommendations for medical and public health professionals following a Bacillus anthracis attack against a civilian population. PARTICIPANTS The working group included 23 experts from academic medical centers, research organizations, and governmental, military, public health, and emergency management institutions and agencies. EVIDENCE MEDLINE databases were searched from January 1966 to January 2002, using the Medical Subject Headings anthrax… Expand
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