Antennal olfactory sensitivity in response to task‐related odours of three castes of the ant Atta mexicana (hymenoptera: formicidae)

@article{LpezRiquelme2006AntennalOS,
  title={Antennal olfactory sensitivity in response to task‐related odours of three castes of the ant Atta mexicana (hymenoptera: formicidae)},
  author={Germ{\'a}n Octavio L{\'o}pez-Riquelme and Edi A. Malo and Leopoldo Cruz‐L{\'o}pez and M{\'a}ria Luisa Fanjul-Moles},
  journal={Physiological Entomology},
  year={2006},
  volume={31}
}
Abstract The relationship between scent composition and antennal sensitivity in different castes of Atta mexicana is investigated under laboratory conditions. Extracts of dead ants are analysed by gas chromatography‐mass spectrometry to identify the compounds presumably responsible for the specific undertaking behaviour. Oleic acid is identified as one compound that triggers undertaking behaviour. To determine differences in odour reception between workers of different castes (i.e. foragers… 

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