Antagonism of reserpine rigidity without inducing sedation

@article{Southwick2004AntagonismOR,
  title={Antagonism of reserpine rigidity without inducing sedation},
  author={Steven Southwick and Rebecca J. Anderson},
  journal={Psychopharmacology},
  year={2004},
  volume={74},
  pages={29-32}
}
The effects of pretreatment with chloropromazine, promethazine or SKF 7265 on the severity of reserpine-induced rigidity were evaluated using a series of behavioral responses. Chlorpromazine (10 mg/kg) reduced the severity of the syndrome, particularly the tremor, but only at doses that also produced marked sedation. SKF 7265 was more effective than chlorpromazine and produced no detectable sedation or other motor impairment. Promethazine was ineffective in protecting against the effects of… 
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