Antagonism of cisplatin-induced emesis by metoclopramide and dazopride through enhancement of gastric motility

@article{Alphin1986AntagonismOC,
  title={Antagonism of cisplatin-induced emesis by metoclopramide and dazopride through enhancement of gastric motility},
  author={Robert S. Alphin and Anthony George Proakis and C. A. Leonard and William L. Smith and Warren Nathaniel Dannenburg and William J. Kinnier and D. N. Johnson and Lawrence F. Sancilio and John W. Ward},
  journal={Digestive Diseases and Sciences},
  year={1986},
  volume={31},
  pages={524-529}
}
The antiemetic activity, gastric motor activity, and dopamine receptor effects of metoclopramide, dazopride, and sulpiride were assessed to establish if enhancement of gastric motility or antagonism of central dopamine receptors is the predominant action for drug-induced suppression of cisplatin-induced emesis. Emesis produced in dogs by cisplatin is antagonized by metoclopramide and dazopride. The antiemetic actions of metoclopramide and dazopride are associated with their ability to enhance… 

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