Anomalous perception in synaesthesia: A cognitive neuroscience perspective

@article{Rich2002AnomalousPI,
  title={Anomalous perception in synaesthesia: A cognitive neuroscience perspective},
  author={Anina N. Rich and Jason B. Mattingley},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2002},
  volume={3},
  pages={43-52}
}
An enduring question in cognitive neuroscience is how the physical properties of the world are represented in the brain to yield conscious perception. In most people, a particular physical stimulus gives rise to a unitary, unimodal perceptual experience. So, light energy leads to the sensation of seeing, whereas sound waves produce the experience of hearing. However, for individuals with the rare phenomenon of synaesthesia, specific physical stimuli consistently induce more than one perceptual… Expand
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