Annual medical spending attributable to obesity: payer-and service-specific estimates.

@article{Finkelstein2009AnnualMS,
  title={Annual medical spending attributable to obesity: payer-and service-specific estimates.},
  author={Eric Andrew Finkelstein and Justin G. Trogdon and Joel W. Cohen and William Dietz},
  journal={Health affairs},
  year={2009},
  volume={28 5},
  pages={
          w822-31
        }
}
In 1998 the medical costs of obesity were estimated to be as high as $78.5 billion, with roughly half financed by Medicare and Medicaid. [...] Key Result We found that the increased prevalence of obesity is responsible for almost $40 billion of increased medical spending through 2006, including $7 billion in Medicare prescription drug costs. We estimate that the medical costs of obesity could have risen to $147 billion per year by 2008.Expand
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The smaller sample size for 1998 does not allow for this level of analysis
  • Medicare