Anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background at degree angular scales: PYTHON V results

@inproceedings{Coble1999AnisotropyIT,
  title={Anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background at degree angular scales: PYTHON V results},
  author={Kim Coble and Mark Dragovan and John M. Kovac and Nils W. Halverson and William L. Holzapfel and Lloyd Knox and Scott Dodelson and Ken Ganga and D. L. Alvarez and Jeffrey B. Peterson and G. S. Griffin and M. G. Newcomb and K. Miller and Stephen R. Platt and Giles Novak},
  year={1999}
}
Observations of the microwave sky using the Python telescope in its fifth season of operation at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica are presented. The system consists of a 0.75 m off-axis telescope instrumented with a HEMT amplifier-based radiometer having continuum sensitivity from 37 to 45 GHz in two frequency bands. With a 091 × 102 beam, the instrument fully sampled 598 deg2 of sky, including fields measured during the previous four seasons of Python observations… 

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