Animals in Healthcare Facilities: Recommendations to Minimize Potential Risks

@article{Murthy2015AnimalsIH,
  title={Animals in Healthcare Facilities: Recommendations to Minimize Potential Risks},
  author={Rekha K. Murthy and Gonzalo M. Bearman and Sherrill Brown and Kristina K Bryant and Raymond Chinn and Angela Hewlett and B Glenn George and Ellie J. C. Goldstein and Galit Holzmann-Pazgal and Mark E. Rupp and Timothy L. Wiemken and Jeffrey Scott Weese and David J Weber},
  journal={Infection Control \&\#x0026; Hospital Epidemiology},
  year={2015},
  volume={36},
  pages={495 - 516}
}
Animals may be present in healthcare facilities for multiple reasons. Although specific laws regarding the use of service animals in public facilities were established in the United States in 1990, the widespread presence of animals in hospitals, including service animals to assist in patient therapy and research, has resulted in the increased presence of animals in acute care hospitals and ambulatory medical settings. The role of animals in the transmission of zoonotic pathogens and cross… 
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