Animal-Related Fatalities in the United States—An Update

@inproceedings{Langley2005AnimalRelatedFI,
  title={Animal-Related Fatalities in the United States—An Update},
  author={Ricky Langley},
  booktitle={Wilderness \& environmental medicine},
  year={2005}
}
  • R. Langley
  • Published in
    Wilderness & environmental…
    2005
  • Geography, Medicine
Abstract Objective. [...] Key Method Methods.—An inquiry of CDC Wonder, a database for epidemiologic research, was used to provide information on animal-related fatalities on the basis of ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes. Results.—From 1991 to 2001, 1943 persons died in the United States after venomous and nonvenomous animal encounters. An average of 177 fatalities per year were recorded. Venomous animal encounters were responsible for 39% of the fatalities. White males appear to be the group most likely to die from an…Expand
Animal-Caused Fatalities in New Mexico, 1993–2004
  • S. Lathrop
  • Medicine
  • Wilderness & environmental medicine
  • 2007
TLDR
A review of animal-caused fatalities investigated by a medical examiner in New Mexico revealed that in many cases, deaths could have been prevented by either the use of protective gear or alterations in human behavior. Expand
An Update on Fatalities Due to Venomous and Nonvenomous Animals in the United States (2008-2015).
TLDR
Appropriate education and prevention measures aimed at decreasing injury from animals should be directed at the high-risk groups of agricultural workers and young children with dogs and public policy and treatment pricing should align to ensure adequate available medication for those at risk of anaphylaxis from stings from Hymenoptera. Expand
Fatalities from venomous and nonvenomous animals in the United States (1999-2007).
TLDR
Prevention measures aimed at minimizing injury from animals should be directed at certain high-risk groups such as farmworkers, agricultural workers, and parents of children with dogs. Expand
Animal-Related Injuries Resulting in Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations in the United States, 2006–2008
TLDR
Over 1 million hospital ED visits and 48,000 hospitalizations were reported annually in the United States due to an animal-caused injury during this time period and the estimated cost of these visits, excluding physician fees during hospitalization, exceeded $2 billion annually. Expand
Animal-Encounter Fatalities, United States, 1999-2016: Cause of Death and Misreporting
TLDR
Animal-encounter fatalities, analyzed by UCD alone, may be underreported, and ongoing training for medical certifiers is recommended, highlighting accurate identification of UCD and contributing causes in the causal chain of death. Expand
Fatal deer attack in a rutting season
TLDR
A substantial increase in the levels of selected hormones, especially testosterone, during the rutting season explains the increased levels of aggression shown by the deer that led to a fatal outcome for the decedent. Expand
Occupational Fatalities Due to Mammal-Related Accidents in Japan, 2000-2019.
TLDR
Although the number of fatal occupational accidents related to mammals is not large, it is necessary to continue preventive measures centered on accidents at livestock farms and in horse racing-related workplaces and to inform people about the risks of infectious diseases mediated by dogs and cats. Expand
Fatalities Due to Indigenous and Exotic Species in Florida
TLDR
Seven animal attack‐related deaths that occurred in Florida are reported to illustrate the varied circumstances and pathophysiologies associated with deaths due to indigenous and exotic species and the importance of the multidisciplinary approach in the medicolegal investigation of these cases. Expand
Deaths from reptile bites in the United States, 1979–2004
TLDR
White males living in the Southern part of the United States are more likely to be the victim of a fatal reptile envenomation. Expand
Snakebite Injuries Treated in United States Emergency Departments, 2001–2004
TLDR
E Epidemiologic data regarding snakebites provide practicing physicians with an understanding of the population affected and can help guide public health practitioners in their prevention efforts. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 30 REFERENCES
Deaths resulting from animal attacks in the United States.
TLDR
Both fatal and nonfatal animal-related injuries are under-recognized public health hazards and health care providers should educate their patients on exercising caution around animals. Expand
Fatalities caused by nonvenomous animals: a ten-year summary from Sweden.
TLDR
All 58 deaths caused by nonvenomous animals in Sweden 1975-1984 were scrutinized and it was suggested that wearing a proper helmet is the most important safety measure in horse-related activities and the herding of untethered bulls together with cows is particularly dangerous and should be avoided. Expand
Nonfatal dog bite-related injuries treated in hospital emergency departments--United States, 2001.
TLDR
It is indicated that in 2001, an estimated 368,245 persons were treated in U.S. hospital EDs for nonfatal dog bite-related injuries, and injury rates were highest among children aged 5-9 years. Expand
Bee‐sting mortality in Australia
TLDR
It appears that the prevention of death per se is not a strong rationale for routine bee‐venom immunotherapy in schoolchildren and young adults in Australia. Expand
Surveillance of animal-bite cases in the United States, 1971-1972.
TLDR
In January 1971, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) initiated a national animal-bite surveillance program in cooperation with 15 health jurisdictions that agreed to submit data to the center, and data pertaining to some factors associated with animal bites were reported. Expand
Hymenoptera venom‐specific IgE antibodies in post‐mortem sera from victims of sudden, unexpected death
TLDR
The appreciable incidence of elevated IgE antibodies in the post‐mortem groups suggests that sting anaphylaxis should be more highly considered as a possible cause of unexpected death. Expand
Allergic reactions to Triatoma bites.
TLDR
Triatoma bites appear to be an important cause of anaphylaxis, especially in the western and southwestern United States, and the development of an allergen under the Orphan Drug Act should be encouraged. Expand
Unreported dog bites in children.
TLDR
Being bitten was not significantly associated, in most groups of children studied, with a dislike of dogs, and positive attitudes toward dogs may lead to inadequate precautions against bites and to biases in the reporting of bites to health authorities. Expand
A LITERATURE REVIEW FOR ASSESSING THE STATUS OF CURRENT METHODS OF REDUCING DEER-VEHICLE COLLISIONS
This paper describes how many Americans are not homogenous in their feelings and attitudes regarding animals. Consideration of the various attitudes and demands of the public is necessary whenExpand
The global burden of disease: a comprehensive assessment of mortality and disability from diseases injuries and risk factors in 1990 and projected to 2020.
TLDR
This is the first in a planned series of 10 volumes that will attempt to "summarize epidemiological knowledge about all major conditions and most risk factors" and use historical trends in main determinants to project mortality and disease burden forward to 2020. Expand
...
1
2
3
...