Animal Protein Intake and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The E3N Prospective Study

@article{Jantchou2010AnimalPI,
  title={Animal Protein Intake and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The E3N Prospective Study},
  author={Pr{\'e}vost Jantchou and Sophie Morois and Francoise Clavel-Chapelon and Marie‐Christine Boutron‐Ruault and Franck Carbonnel},
  journal={The American Journal of Gastroenterology},
  year={2010},
  volume={105},
  pages={2195-2201}
}
OBJECTIVES:Diet composition has long been suspected to contribute to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but has not been thoroughly assessed, and has been assessed only in retrospective studies that are prone to recall bias. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of dietary macronutrients in the etiology of IBD in a large prospective cohort.METHODS:The Etude Épidémiologique des femmes de la Mutuelle Générale de l’Education Nationale cohort consists of women living in France, aged… Expand
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