Anglo-Irish and Gaelic marriage laws and traditions in late medieval Ireland

@article{Kenny2006AngloIrishAG,
  title={Anglo-Irish and Gaelic marriage laws and traditions in late medieval Ireland},
  author={Gillian Kenny},
  journal={Journal of Medieval History},
  year={2006},
  volume={32},
  pages={27 - 42}
}
  • Gillian Kenny
  • Published 1 March 2006
  • History, Economics
  • Journal of Medieval History
27 Citations
Cultural Exchange and Identity in Late Medieval Ireland: The English and Irish of the Four Obedient Shires
The English colony in Ireland was over two centuries old in 1399 and a complex web of social, economic, and legal relationships had evolved between its two main population groups – the English of
Marriage, sex and death: the family in the post-Imperial west
This thesis presents a cultural history of families and family roles in the post-Imperial west, here defined as AD 400-700. This thesis questions the ‘tri-partite’ influences of Roman heritage,
Absolutions and Acts of Disobedience: Excommunication and Society in Fourteenth-Century Armagh
orably, should not injure another, and should accord to each person his own rights."1 Yet despite the proliferation of canon laws and ecclesiastical legal procedures, Archbishop Milo Sweteman,
The Marriage Well at Teltown: holy well ritual at royal cult sites and the rite of temporary marriage
This article discusses Lag an Aonaigh, the ‘Marriage Well’ of Teltown, and the unusual temporary marriage ritual that once took place there during the annual Lughnasa festival. The relationship of
Three faces of civilization: ‘In the beginning all the world was Ireland’
This paper outlines a refinement of the sociological usage of the concept ‘civilization’ by distinguishing between three different ‘faces’ of civilization – as the opposite of barbarism, as
Three Faces of Civilization: ‘In the Beginning All the World was Ireland’
This paper outlines a refinement of the sociological usage of the concept ‘civilization’ by distinguishing between three different ‘faces’ of civilization – as the opposite of barbarism, as
Widows, Native Law and the Long Shadow of England in Thirteenth-Century Wales*
  • E. Cavell
  • Law
    The English Historical Review
  • 2018
This item is brought to you by Swansea University. Any person downloading material is agreeing to abide by the terms of the repository licence. Copies of full text items may be used or reproduced in
A Teapot, a House, or Both? The Material Possessions of Irish Women’s California Assemblages
Using a woman-centered approach, artifact assemblages and background documents are analyzed to discern gender behavior and ethnic variations in women’s work—cooking, dining, housecleaning—in more
List of Publications on the Economic and Social History of Great Britain and Ireland Published in 2006
(The place of publication is London and the date 2006 unless otherwise stated.)
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 17 REFERENCES
Sisters and workers in the Middle Ages
Focusing on medieval women with a wide range of occupations and life-styles, the interdisciplinary essays in this collection examine women's activities within the patriarchal structures of the time.
Gillian Kenny completed her doctoral thesis at Trinity College Dublin in 2004 where she then taught. She is currently working on adapting her thesis into a book to be published by Four Courts Press
  • 2006
Women and the law in early modern Ireland
  • Women in renaissance and early modern Europe
  • 2000
Women in medieval Dublin: an introduction
  • 2000
The Dublin city franchise roll 1468e1512
  • 1998
The problem of degeneracy
  • Law and disorder in thirteenth century Ireland: the parliament of 1297
  • 1997
Life in the late middle ages
  • A history of women in the west II: silences of the middle ages
  • 1995
For better, for worse: marriage and economic opportunity for women in town and country
  • Woman is a worthy wight: women in English society c. 1200e1500
  • 1992
The Kavanaghs 1400e1700
  • Irish Genealogist
  • 1977
...
1
2
...