Anglo-American vs. Franco-German Emergency Medical Services System

@article{Dick2003AngloAmericanVF,
  title={Anglo-American vs. Franco-German Emergency Medical Services System},
  author={Wolfgang F. Dick},
  journal={Prehospital and Disaster Medicine},
  year={2003},
  volume={18},
  pages={29 - 37}
}
  • W. Dick
  • Published 1 March 2003
  • Medicine
  • Prehospital and Disaster Medicine
Abstract It has been stated that the Franco-German Emergency Medical Services System (FGS) has considerable drawbacks compared to the Anglo-American Emergency Medical Services System (AAS): 1. The key differences between the AAS and the FGS are that in the AAS, the patients is brought to the doctor, while in the FGS, the doctor is brought to the patient. 2. In the FGS, patients with urgent conditions usually are evaluated and treated by general practitioners in their offices or at the patient`s… 
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