Angiotensin-receptor blockade versus converting-enzyme inhibition in type 2 diabetes and nephropathy.

@article{Barnett2004AngiotensinreceptorBV,
  title={Angiotensin-receptor blockade versus converting-enzyme inhibition in type 2 diabetes and nephropathy.},
  author={Anthony H. Barnett and Stephen C. Bain and Paul K. Bouter and Bengt E. Karlberg and Sten Madsbad and Jak Jervell and Jukka T Mustonen},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={351 19},
  pages={
          1952-61
        }
}
BACKGROUND Few studies have directly compared the renoprotective effects of angiotensin II-receptor blockers and angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in persons with type 2 diabetes. METHODS In this prospective, multicenter, double-blind, five-year study, we randomly assigned 250 subjects with type 2 diabetes and early nephropathy to receive either the angiotensin II-receptor blocker telmisartan (80 mg daily, in 120 subjects) or the ACE inhibitor enalapril (20 mg daily, in 130… 

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