Aneuploidy and cancer

@article{Rajagopalan2004AneuploidyAC,
  title={Aneuploidy and cancer},
  author={Harith Rajagopalan and C. Lengauer},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={432},
  pages={338-341}
}
In contrast to normal cells, aneuploidy — alterations in the number of chromosomes — is consistently observed in virtually all cancers. A growing body of evidence suggests that aneuploidy is often caused by a particular type of genetic instability, called chromosomal instability, which may reflect defects in mitotic segregation in cancer cells. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to aneuploidy holds promise for the development of cancer drugs that target this process. 
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TLDR
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Modelling the Role of Aneuploidy in Tumour Evolution
TLDR
A computational model of cancer evolution has been developed and results show that, depending on the arrangement of tumour suppressors, proto-oncogenes and regulators of chromosome segregation in the genome, aneuploidy induces distinct pathways for the generation of novel genotypes leading to emergent cancer-like behaviour. Expand
Aneuploidy: a matter of bad connections.
TLDR
The outcome of studies in mice and humans suggest that small changes in the expression, rather than complete inactivation, of genes encoding specific proteins might be associated with aneuploidy in living organisms, focusing on the importance of kinetochore misattachments in producing aneuPLoid cells. Expand
A little CIN may cost a lot: revisiting aneuploidy and cancer.
TLDR
It is explored the possibility that aneuploidy could be just another type of 'mutation', with potential beneficial and deleterious effects, depending on the chromosomes involved and the specific selective pressures the cells experience. Expand
Nek2 kinase in chromosome instability and cancer.
TLDR
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The Kinetochore-Cancer Connection
TLDR
In this chapter, recent progress in the understanding of how kinetochore dysfunction underlies CIN is introduced and described and how it leads to the development of cancer is discussed. Expand
Tetraploidy/aneuploidy and stem cells in cancer promotion: The role of chromosome passenger proteins
TLDR
It is intriguing to speculate that in some cancers, tetraploidy/aneuploidsy induced by deregulated expression of a mitotic regulator represents a primary event that leads to unbalanced expression ofA cluster of crucial genes and to cellular transformation. Expand
Aneuploidy impairs hematopoietic stem cell fitness and is selected against in regenerating tissues in vivo.
TLDR
It is found that aneuploid hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit decreased fitness, which indicates that, in vivo, mechanisms exist to select against aneuPLoid cells. Expand
Are aneuploidy and chromosome breakage caused by a CINgle mechanism?
TLDR
The recent data indicate that spindle defects are an early event in tumor formation, and an important initiator of carcinogenesis, and a single mechanism could account for all genetic alterations characteristic of chromosomal instability. Expand
Whole chromosome instability and cancer: a complex relationship.
TLDR
It is proposed that the effect of W-CIN on tumor development depends on the particular W- CIN gene that is defective, including its other cellular functions, the extent or nature of the gene defect, the affected tissue or cell type and the context of other cancer gene mutations. Expand
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