Anesthesia or sedation for gastroenterologic endoscopies

@article{Luginbhl2009AnesthesiaOS,
  title={Anesthesia or sedation for gastroenterologic endoscopies},
  author={Martin Luginb{\"u}hl and Pascal Henri Vuilleumier and Peter Schumacher and F. St{\"u}ber},
  journal={Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology},
  year={2009},
  volume={22},
  pages={524–531}
}
Purpose of review Because propofol is the sedative preferred by gastroenterologists, we focus this review on gastroenterologist-directed propofol sedation, provide simulations of the respiratory depressant effect of different dosing protocols and give a perspective on future developments in computer-assisted sedation techniques. Recent findings Propofol use by nonanesthesiologists remains a contraindication in the package insert of propofol in most countries. Sedation guidelines produced by the… 

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