Androstadienone in Motor Reactions of Men and Women toward Angry Faces

@article{Frey2012AndrostadienoneIM,
  title={Androstadienone in Motor Reactions of Men and Women toward Angry Faces},
  author={M. C. Frey and P. Weyers and P. Pauli and A. M{\"u}hlberger},
  journal={Perceptual and Motor Skills},
  year={2012},
  volume={114},
  pages={807 - 825}
}
  • M. C. Frey, P. Weyers, +1 author A. Mühlberger
  • Published 2012
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Perceptual and Motor Skills
  • The endogenous compound androstadienone modulating the evaluation of others and activating the human fear system was hypothesized in terms of processing socially relevant cues by regulating responses to angry faces. Androstadienone was investigated in association with arm movements of 62 participants (30 women) in response to happy and angry facial expressions. Volunteers pushed away or pulled toward them a joystick as fast as possible on seeing either an angry or a happy cartoon face on a… CONTINUE READING
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