Androgens, aging, and Alzheimer's disease

@article{Pike2007AndrogensAA,
  title={Androgens, aging, and Alzheimer's disease},
  author={Christian J. Pike and Emily R Rosario and Thuy-vi Nguyen},
  journal={Endocrine},
  year={2007},
  volume={29},
  pages={233-241}
}
Testoterone depletion is a normal consequence of aging in men that is associated with senescent effects in androgen-responsive tissues. We discuss new evidence that one consequence of testosterone depletion in men is an increased risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Furthermore, we discuss two candidate mechanisms by which test osterone may affect AD pathogenesis. First, testosterone has been identified as an endogenous regulator of β-amyloid, a protein that abnormally… Expand
Androgen regulation of β-amyloid protein and the risk of Alzheimer's disease
Advancing age is the most significant risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however the age-related changes that underlie this effect remain unclear. In men, one normalExpand
Aging and Alzheimer's Disease
Publisher Summary This chapter discusses aging and Alzheimer's disease. The possibility that aging-associated alterations of neuroendocrine systems contribute to the pathophysiology of behavioralExpand
Androgens Regulate the Development of Neuropathology in a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease
TLDR
It is demonstrated that androgen depletion accelerates the development of AD-like neuropathology, suggesting that a similar mechanism may underlie the increased risk for AD in men with low testosterone and predicted that androgens-based hormone therapy may be a useful strategy for the prevention and treatment of AD in aging men. Expand
4.16 – Aging and Alzheimer's Disease
With an aging population on the rise, there is a projected exponential expansion in the prevalence of dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is the most common form of dementia,Expand
Androgen receptor gene and gender specific Alzheimer ’ s disease
Women are at a twofold risk of developing late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) (onset ≥65 years of age) compared to men. During perimenopausal years, women undergo hormonal changes that areExpand
Estrogen-Mediated Neuroprotection: Hope to Combat Neuronal Degeneration and Synaptic Plasticity Post-menopause
TLDR
The findings have revealed that ovariectomy or natural aging leads to decreased synaptic activity, degenerative cytoarchitectural changes and altered protein levels in hippocampal neurons, and it was seen that long-term estrogen therapy maintains the synaptic plasticity, regulates apoptotic proteins and affords neuroprotection to the hippocampusal neurons through both the nuclear and membrane estrogen receptor mediated pCREB and MAPK activation. Expand
Ropren® treatment reverses anxiety-like behavior and monoamines levels in gonadectomized rat model of Alzheimer's disease.
TLDR
The results indicate that Ropren® has a marked anxiolytic-like action due to an increase in the monoamines levels in the experimental rat model of Alzheimer's disease with altered levels of androgens. Expand
Genetic Variation in the Androgen Receptor and Measures of Plasma Testosterone Levels Suggest Androgen Dysfunction in Alzheimer’s Disease
TLDR
A link between the androgen pathway and AD through Aβ/tau independent pathways is suggested, which may be most pronounced during conversion from MCI to dementia, and a link between plasma testosterone and CSF biomarkers of AD is found. Expand
Hypothalamic–Pituitary–Gonadal Axis Involvement in Learning and Memory and Alzheimer’s Disease: More than “Just” Estrogen
TLDR
It is emphasized that reproductive hormones are influential in maintaining neuronal health and enhancing signaling cascades that lead to cognitive impairment and the therapeutic potential of endocrine modulation in the prevention of age-related cognitive decline. Expand
Neuroendocrinology‐based therapy for Alzheimer's disease
TLDR
This review will summarize and critically evaluate how age‐related changes in sex and metabolic hormones modulate affect cognitive function and the implications of targeting the neuroendocrine system as a therapeutic strategy in Alzheimer's disease. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 142 REFERENCES
Brain oestradiol and testosterone levels in Alzheimer's disease
TLDR
The results show that in control brain, oestradiol levels are 3.5 fold higher in females than males, though testosterone levels are equivalent, which does not support the hypothesis that a lack of oestrogen is a contributory factor in AD. Expand
Androgens modulate β‐amyloid levels in male rat brain
TLDR
The findings suggest that age‐related androgen depletion may result in accumulation of Aβ in the male brain and thereby act as a risk factor for the development of AD. Expand
Novel therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease based on the forgotten reproductive hormones.
TLDR
A novel mechanism of how changes in serum luteinizing hormone concentrations could contribute to the pathogenesis of AD is put forth and potential therapeutic anti-gonadotropin compounds are discussed. Expand
Impact of Estrogen Therapy on Alzheimer’s Disease
TLDR
The time at which estrogen therapy is initiated, the neurological status of the brain at the time of estrogen therapy initiation and the type of progestogen used all contribute to the efficacy of estrogen in preventing neurodegenerative disease and to sustaining neurological health and function. Expand
Estrogen and Alzheimer’s Disease
TLDR
Evidence from epidemiological studies supports enhanced cognitive function in women with AD taking estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) as well as a reduced risk for developing AD in healthy women receiving ERT, but results from more recent controlled trials have not consistently shown a beneficial effect of estrogen on the cognitive function of women withAD. Expand
Testosterone attenuates β-amyloid toxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons
TLDR
C cultured neurons were exposed to the Alzheimer’s disease-related insult β-amyloid in the presence of testosterone, and β-Amyloid neurotoxicity was significantly reduced by testosterone via a rapid, estrogen-independent mechanism. Expand
Androgen deficiency in the aging male: benefits and risks of androgen supplementation
  • L. Gooren
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • 2003
TLDR
It seems a defensible practice to treat aging men with androgens if and when they are testosterone-deficient, but long-term studies including sufficient numbers of men are needed. Expand
Serum Testosterone Levels in Males with Alzheimer's Disease
TLDR
Testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels were measured from 14 patients with mild to moderate AD and 16 age‐matched control males, and data show that all cognitively normal controls had an FAI below the normal range. Expand
Plasma testosterone levels in Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases
TLDR
Ass associations between low testosterone levels and frontal lobe dysfunction in normal aged men, together with these results, suggest that the hormonal deficiency may act as a “second hit” to impair cognitive function in neurodegenerative disease. Expand
Modulation of Aβ peptides by estrogen in mouse models
TLDR
Evidence that post‐menopausal estrogen depletion may be linked to an increased risk of AD through Aβ modulation is provided, and data suggest that, in vivo, estrogen depletion leads to the accumulation of Aβ in the CNS, which can be reversed through replacement of estradiol. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...