Ancient waste pits with wood ash irreversibly increase crop production in Central Europe

@article{Hejcman2010AncientWP,
  title={Ancient waste pits with wood ash irreversibly increase crop production in Central Europe},
  author={Michal Hejcman and Jiř{\'i} Ondr{\'a}{\vc}ek and Zdeněk Smr{\vz}},
  journal={Plant and Soil},
  year={2010},
  volume={339},
  pages={341-350}
}
During an aerial archeological survey performed in spring 2009, we detected positive cropmarks (increased biomass production) indicating waste pits in the subsoil in a winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) stand. Based on pottery samples, the waste pits were dated to the end of the twelfth century or to the first half of the thirteenth century. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there were any differences in the soil chemical properties in arable and subsoil layers between cropmarks… CONTINUE READING

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