Ancient adaptations of human skin: why do we retain sebaceous and apocrine glands?

@article{Lupi2008AncientAO,
  title={Ancient adaptations of human skin: why do we retain sebaceous and apocrine glands?},
  author={Omar Lupi},
  journal={International Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2008},
  volume={47}
}
  • O. Lupi
  • Published 2008
  • Medicine
  • International Journal of Dermatology
Human evolution has been characterized by a marked decrease in body hair and an increase in the importance of pigment in the naked epidermis as a shield against the harmful effects of solar radiation. 1 Humans are not hairless and, when we use this term with respect to humans, it means the lack of a dense layer of thick fur. 1,2 The number and density of hair follicles are similar to those of our nearest primate relatives; the uniqueness of human skin is that human body hair is miniaturized… Expand
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