Ancient Wolf Genome Reveals an Early Divergence of Domestic Dog Ancestors and Admixture into High-Latitude Breeds

@article{Skoglund2015AncientWG,
  title={Ancient Wolf Genome Reveals an Early Divergence of Domestic Dog Ancestors and Admixture into High-Latitude Breeds},
  author={Pontus Skoglund and Erik Ersmark and Eleftheria Palkopoulou and Love Dal{\'e}n},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2015},
  volume={25},
  pages={1515-1519}
}

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