Ancient Moab: Still Largely Unknown

@article{Miller1997AncientMS,
  title={Ancient Moab: Still Largely Unknown},
  author={Max Miller},
  journal={The Biblical Archaeologist},
  year={1997},
  volume={60},
  pages={194 - 204}
}
  • Max Miller
  • Published 1 December 1997
  • History
  • The Biblical Archaeologist
Ancient times knew the region immediately east of the Dead Sea as Moab. Until recently, mapmakers and explorers-from Tristram to Glueck-added only fitfully to what we knew of the land of Moab from ancient inscriptions and the Hebrew Bible. Advances in archaeological method and the interpretation of literary traditions have brought new insights to this legacy. The study of Moab is gaining momentum. 
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