Ancient DNA sequences point to a large loss of mitochondrial genetic diversity in the saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica) since the Pleistocene

@article{Campos2010AncientDS,
  title={Ancient DNA sequences point to a large loss of mitochondrial genetic diversity in the saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica) since the Pleistocene},
  author={Paula F. Campos and Thomas K. Kristensen and Ludovic Orlando and Andrei V. Sher and Marina V. Kholodova and Anders G{\"o}therstr{\"o}m and Michael Hofreiter and Doroth{\'e}e G. Drucker and Pavel A Kosintsev and Alexei N. Tikhonov and Gennady F. Baryshnikov and Eske Willerslev and M. Thomas P. Gilbert},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2010},
  volume={19}
}
Prior to the Holocene, the range of the saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica) spanned from France to the Northwest Territories of Canada. Although its distribution subsequently contracted to the steppes of Central Asia, historical records indicate that it remained extremely abundant until the end of the Soviet Union, after which its populations were reduced by over 95%. We have analysed the mitochondrial control region sequence variation of 27 ancient and 38 modern specimens, to assay how the species… Expand
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