Ancient DNA reveals differences in behaviour and sociality between brown bears and extinct cave bears

@article{Fortes2016AncientDR,
  title={Ancient DNA reveals differences in behaviour and sociality between brown bears and extinct cave bears},
  author={Gloria G. Fortes and Aurora Grandal-d’Anglade and Ben Kolbe and Daniel M. Fernandes and Ioana N. Meleg and Ana Garc{\'i}a-V{\'a}zquez and Ana C. Pinto-Llona and Silviu Constantin and Trino J. Torres and Jos{\'e} E. Ortiz and Christine Frischauf and Gernot Rabeder and Michael Hofreiter and Axel Barlow},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2016},
  volume={25}
}
Ancient DNA studies have revolutionized the study of extinct species and populations, providing insights on phylogeny, phylogeography, admixture and demographic history. However, inferences on behaviour and sociality have been far less frequent. Here, we investigate the complete mitochondrial genomes of extinct Late Pleistocene cave bears and middle Holocene brown bears that each inhabited multiple geographically proximate caves in northern Spain. In cave bears, we find that, although most… 
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