Ancient DNA Reveals Prehistoric Gene-Flow from Siberia in the Complex Human Population History of North East Europe

@article{DerSarkissian2013AncientDR,
  title={Ancient DNA Reveals Prehistoric Gene-Flow from Siberia in the Complex Human Population History of North East Europe},
  author={Clio Der Sarkissian and Oleg P. Balanovsky and Guido Brandt and Valery Khartanovich and Alexandra P. Buzhilova and Sergey M. Koshel and Valery V. Zaporozhchenko and Detlef Gronenborn and Vyacheslav Moiseyev and Eugen Kolpakov and Vladimir Shumkin and Kurt W. Alt and Elena V. Balanovska and Alan Cooper and Wolfgang Haak},
  journal={PLoS Genetics},
  year={2013},
  volume={9}
}
North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better… Expand

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