Anatomy and dimensions of rotator cuff insertions.

@article{Dugas2002AnatomyAD,
  title={Anatomy and dimensions of rotator cuff insertions.},
  author={Jeffrey R. Dugas and Deirdre A Campbell and Russell F. Warren and Bruce H. Robie and Peter J. Millett},
  journal={Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery},
  year={2002},
  volume={11 5},
  pages={
          498-503
        }
}
The purpose of this study was to devise and implement an accurate and reproducible method of measuring the area and dimensions of the rotator cuff tendon insertions and their distance from the articular surface. Twenty fresh-frozen cadaveric upper-extremity specimens were divided into 2 groups of 10. In group 1 the specimens were dissected, leaving only the most distal rotator cuff tendons attached to the humerus. The periphery of the insertion onto the greater tuberosity was marked at 3-mm… 

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