Anatomical predictions of hearing in the North Atlantic right whale

@article{Parks2007AnatomicalPO,
  title={Anatomical predictions of hearing in the North Atlantic right whale},
  author={S. Parks and D. Ketten and J. O’Malley and J. Arruda},
  journal={The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={290}
}
  • S. Parks, D. Ketten, +1 author J. Arruda
  • Published 2007
  • Medicine, Biology
  • The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
  • Some knowledge of the hearing abilities of right whales is important for understanding their acoustic communication system and possible impacts of anthropogenic noise. Traditional behavioral or physiological techniques to test hearing are not feasible with right whales. Previous research on the hearing of marine mammals has shown that functional models are reliable estimators of hearing sensitivity in marine species. Fundamental to these models is a comprehensive analysis of inner ear anatomy… CONTINUE READING

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