Anatomical and Ecological Evidence of Endothermy in Dinosaurs

@article{Bakker1972AnatomicalAE,
  title={Anatomical and Ecological Evidence of Endothermy in Dinosaurs},
  author={Robert T. Bakker},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1972},
  volume={238},
  pages={81-85}
}
  • R. Bakker
  • Published 1 July 1972
  • Geography
  • Nature
Recognition of endothermy in dinosaurs can explain both the success and the extinction of this group in the Mesozoic. 
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  • Environmental Science
    Paleobiology
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  • Environmental Science, Biology
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