Anatomical adaptations of aquatic mammals

@article{Reidenberg2007AnatomicalAO,
  title={Anatomical adaptations of aquatic mammals},
  author={Joy S. Reidenberg},
  journal={The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={290}
}
  • J. Reidenberg
  • Published 1 June 2007
  • Biology
  • The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
This special issue of the Anatomical Record explores many of the anatomical adaptations exhibited by aquatic mammals that enable life in the water. Anatomical observations on a range of fossil and living marine and freshwater mammals are presented, including sirenians (manatees and dugongs), cetaceans (both baleen whales and toothed whales, including dolphins and porpoises), pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses), the sea otter, and the pygmy hippopotamus. A range of anatomical systems are… 
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