Anaphylaxis in the emergency department: a paediatric perspective

@article{Martelli2008AnaphylaxisIT,
  title={Anaphylaxis in the emergency department: a paediatric perspective},
  author={A. Martelli and D. Ghiglioni and T. Sarratud and E. Calcinai and Suzanne Veehof and L. Terracciano and A. Fiocchi},
  journal={Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology},
  year={2008},
  volume={8},
  pages={321–329}
}
Purpose of review Correct management of anaphylactic manifestations in the emergency department is crucial to prevent mortality and future episodes, in particular for paediatric patients. We make here recommendations based on a critical review of the evidence for the management of anaphylaxis in emergency department with particular emphasis on children. Recent findings Available information suggests that anaphylaxis must be promptly recognized keeping in mind the airway patency, breathing… Expand
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