Anaphylaxis caused by ingesting jellyfish in a subject with fermented soybean allergy: possibility of epicutaneous sensitization to poly-gamma-glutamic acid by jellyfish stings.

@article{Inomata2014AnaphylaxisCB,
  title={Anaphylaxis caused by ingesting jellyfish in a subject with fermented soybean allergy: possibility of epicutaneous sensitization to poly-gamma-glutamic acid by jellyfish stings.},
  author={Naoko Inomata and Keishi Chin and Michiko Aihara},
  journal={The Journal of dermatology},
  year={2014},
  volume={41 8},
  pages={752-3}
}
Dear Editor, Jellyfish stings are known to induce delayed allergic skin reactions, however, there have been few reports of reactions after jellyfish ingestion. We report herein on anaphylaxis after jellyfish ingestion in a subject allergic to fermented soybeans (natt o). A 45-year-old man presented with two episodes of anaphylactic reaction 2 h after dinners including jellyfish salad, accompanied by dyspnea, chest tightness, abdominal cramps, palpitations, vomiting, dizziness, headache and loss… CONTINUE READING
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