Anaphylaxis caused by Hymenoptera stings: from epidemiology to treatment

@article{Bil2011AnaphylaxisCB,
  title={Anaphylaxis caused by Hymenoptera stings: from epidemiology to treatment},
  author={M. Bil{\`o}},
  journal={Allergy},
  year={2011},
  volume={66}
}
To cite this article: Bilò MB. Anaphylaxis caused by Hymenoptera stings: from epidemiology to treatment. Allergy 2011; 66 (Suppl. 95): 35–37. 
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Subcutaneous venom immunotherapy with ultra-rush regimen was safe and effective, providing the comfort of a smaller number of injections and hospital visits during the induction phase, and maintenance therapy has demonstrated a protective effect on re-exposure to the poison in one child. Expand
Stinging Insect Allergens.
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This paper reviewed the studies that have addressed the identified allergenicity and cross-reactivity of Hymenoptera venom allergens accepted by the WHO/IUIS Nomenclature Sub-committee, the component-resolved diagnosis of Hywomenptera venom allergy and its predictive values for the efficacy and safety of venom immunotherapy. Expand
Stinging Insect Allergens.
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Hymenoptera Venom Allergy: Management of Children and Adults in Clinical Practice.
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Epidemiology and Treatment
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The realm of animal bites is quite extensive and complex and to suggest that all aspects can be considered in 1 manuscript is unreasonable. Expand
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