Anandamide-Mediated CB1/CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor-Independent Nitric Oxide Production in Rabbit Aortic Endothelial Cells

@article{McCollum2007AnandamideMediatedCC,
  title={Anandamide-Mediated CB1/CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor-Independent Nitric Oxide Production in Rabbit Aortic Endothelial Cells},
  author={LaTronya T. McCollum and Allyn C. Howlett and Somnath Mukhopadhyay},
  journal={Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics},
  year={2007},
  volume={321},
  pages={930 - 937}
}
We have previously shown that the endocannabinoid anandamide and its metabolically stable analog (R)-methanandamide produce vasorelaxation in rabbit aortic ring preparations in an endothelium-dependent manner that could not be mimicked by other CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonists (Am J Physiol 282: H2046–H2054, 2002). Here, we show that (R)-methanandamide and abnormal cannabidiol stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production in rabbit aortic endothelial cells (RAEC) in a dose-dependent manner but that… 

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