Analysis of the complete genome of Fervidococcus fontis confirms the distinct phylogenetic position of the order Fervidicoccales and suggests its environmental function

@article{Lebedinsky2013AnalysisOT,
  title={Analysis of the complete genome of Fervidococcus fontis confirms the distinct phylogenetic position of the order Fervidicoccales and suggests its environmental function},
  author={Alexander V. Lebedinsky and Andrey V. Mardanov and Ilya V. Kublanov and Vadim M. Gumerov and Alexey V. Beletsky and Anna A. Perevalova and Salimat K. Bidzhieva and Elizaveta A. Bonch‐Osmolovskaya and Konstantin G. Skryabin and Nikolai V. Ravin},
  journal={Extremophiles},
  year={2013},
  volume={18},
  pages={295-309}
}
The complete genome of the obligately anaerobic crenarchaeote Fervidicoccus fontis Kam940T, a terrestrial hot spring inhabitant with a growth optimum of 65–70 °C, has been sequenced and analyzed. The small 1.3-Mb genome encodes several extracellular proteases and no other extracellular hydrolases. No complete pathways of carbohydrate catabolism were found. Genes coding for enzymes necessary for amino acid transamination and further oxidative decarboxylation are present. The genome encodes no… Expand
8 Citations
Fervidicoccus fontis Strain 3639Fd, the First Crenarchaeon Capable of Growth on Lipids
Abstract— Up to now, ability of prokaryotes to grow on lipids has been shown only for bacteria. Thermococcus sibiricus, member of the phylum Euryarchaeota isolated from a high-temperature oilExpand
A new symbiotic nanoarchaeote (Candidatus Nanoclepta minutus) and its host (Zestosphaera tikiterensis gen. nov., sp. nov.) from a New Zealand hot spring.
TLDR
Based on phylogenetic, physiological and genomic data, Ncl-1 and NZ3T represent novel genera in the Nanoarchaeota and the Desulfurococcaceae, respectively, with the proposed names Candidatus Nanoclepta minutus and Zestosphaera tikiterensis. Expand
Analysis of Fatty Acid and Growth Profiles in Ten Shewanella spp. to Associate Phylogenetic Relationships
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A systematic and controlled alteration of growth conditions could be used to uncover associations between phylogenetically dissimilarmicroorganisms from the same genus using physiological responses, which resulted in new associations between dissimilar Shewanella spp. Expand
The role of archaea in the origin of eukaryotes
TLDR
Genomes of recently discovered uncultivated proteoarchaea belonging to Lokiarchaea and Asgard-group contain a large sets of eukaryotic-like genes, which allows to suggest that ancient forms of such archaean could participate in symbiotic fusion with bacteria serving as a mitochondrial progenitor. Expand
New thermophilic prokaryotes with hydrolytic activities
TLDR
The present study focused on the biodegradation of drotaverine hydrochloride by free and immobilized cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IEGM 608, a type ofheterotrophic bacteria found in the Mediterranean region. Expand
Sequence conservation, domain architectures, and phylogenetic distribution of the HD-GYP type c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases
TLDR
It is shown that HD-GYP domains are widespread in many environmental bacteria and are predominant c-di-GMP hydrolases in many lineages, including clostridia and deltaproteobacteria. Expand

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