Analysis of recombinant H7N9 wild-type and mutant viruses in pigs shows that the Q226L mutation in HA is important for transmission.

@article{Liu2014AnalysisOR,
  title={Analysis of recombinant H7N9 wild-type and mutant viruses in pigs shows that the Q226L mutation in HA is important for transmission.},
  author={Qinfang Liu and Bin Zhou and Wenjun Ma and Bhupinder Bawa and Jingjiao Ma and Wei Wang and Yuekun Lang and Young S Lyoo and Rebecca A. Halpin and Xudong Lin and Timothy B. Stockwell and Richard R. J. Webby and David E. Wentworth and Juergen A. Richt},
  journal={Journal of virology},
  year={2014},
  volume={88 14},
  pages={8153-65}
}
The fact that there have been more than 300 human infections with a novel avian H7N9 virus in China indicates that this emerging strain has pandemic potential. Furthermore, many of the H7N9 viruses circulating in animal reservoirs contain putative mammalian signatures in the HA and PB2 genes that are believed to be important in the adaptation of other avian strains to humans. To date, the definitive roles of these mammalian-signature substitutions in transmission and pathogenesis of H7N9… CONTINUE READING