Analysis of rbcL sequences reveals the global biodiversity, community structure, and biogeographical pattern of thermoacidophilic red algae (Cyanidiales)

@article{Hsieh2015AnalysisOR,
  title={Analysis of rbcL sequences reveals the global biodiversity, community structure, and biogeographical pattern of thermoacidophilic red algae (Cyanidiales)},
  author={Chia-Jung Hsieh and Shing Hei Zhan and YiChing Lin and Sen-Lin Tang and Shao-Lun Liu},
  journal={Journal of Phycology},
  year={2015},
  volume={51}
}
Thermoacidophilic cyanidia (Cyanidiales) are the primary photosynthetic eukaryotes in volcanic areas. These red algae also serve as important model organisms for studying life in extreme habitats. The global biodiversity and community structure of Cyanidiales remain unclear despite previous sampling efforts. Here, we surveyed the Cyanidiales biodiversity in the Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) area in Taiwan using environmental DNA sequencing. We generated 174 rbcL sequences from eight samples from… 
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