Analysis of pulpal reactions to restorative procedures, materials, pulp capping, and future therapies.

@article{Murray2002AnalysisOP,
  title={Analysis of pulpal reactions to restorative procedures, materials, pulp capping, and future therapies.},
  author={P. Murray and L. Windsor and T. W. Smyth and Abeer A Hafez and C. Cox},
  journal={Critical reviews in oral biology and medicine : an official publication of the American Association of Oral Biologists},
  year={2002},
  volume={13 6},
  pages={
          509-20
        }
}
  • P. Murray, L. Windsor, +2 authors C. Cox
  • Published 2002
  • Medicine
  • Critical reviews in oral biology and medicine : an official publication of the American Association of Oral Biologists
Every year, despite the effectiveness of preventive dentistry and dental health care, 290 million fillings are placed each year in the United States; two-thirds of these involve the replacement of failed restorations. Improvements in the success of restorative treatments may be possible if caries management strategies, selection of restorative materials, and their proper use to avoid post-operative complications were investigated from a biological perspective. Consequently, this review will… Expand
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