Analyses of mental dysfunction-related ACSl4 in Drosophila reveal its requirement for Dpp/BMP production and visual wiring in the brain.

@article{Zhang2009AnalysesOM,
  title={Analyses of mental dysfunction-related ACSl4 in Drosophila reveal its requirement for Dpp/BMP production and visual wiring in the brain.},
  author={Yi Zhang and Di Chen and Zhao-hui Wang},
  journal={Human molecular genetics},
  year={2009},
  volume={18 20},
  pages={
          3894-905
        }
}
Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) convert long-chain fatty acids to acyl-CoAs, the activated substrates essential in various metabolic and signaling pathways. Mutations in ACSL4 are associated with non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (MRX). However, the developmental functions of ACSL4 and how it is involved in the pathogenesis of MRX remain largely unknown. The Drosophila ACSL-like protein is highly homologous to human ACSL3 and ACSL4, and we designate it as dAcsl. In this study… CONTINUE READING

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