Analgesia and pulmonary function after lung surgery: is a single intercostal nerve block plus patient-controlled intravenous morphine as effective as patient-controlled epidural anaesthesia? A randomized non-inferiority clinical trial.

@article{Meierhenrich2011AnalgesiaAP,
  title={Analgesia and pulmonary function after lung surgery: is a single intercostal nerve block plus patient-controlled intravenous morphine as effective as patient-controlled epidural anaesthesia? A randomized non-inferiority clinical trial.},
  author={Rainer Meierhenrich and Danielle Hock and Simone K{\"u}hn and Eug{\`e}ne Balt{\`e}s and Bernd Manfred Muehling and R. Muche and Michael Georgieff and G Gorsewski},
  journal={British journal of anaesthesia},
  year={2011},
  volume={106 4},
  pages={580-9}
}
BACKGROUND Thoracic epidural anaesthesia (EDA) is regarded as the 'gold standard' for postoperative pain control and restoration of pulmonary function after lung surgery. Easier, less time-consuming, and, perhaps, safer is intercostal nerve block performed under direct vision by the surgeon before closure of the thoracotomy combined with postoperative i.v. patient-controlled analgesia with morphine. We hypothesized that this technique is as effective as thoracic EDA. METHODS The study was… CONTINUE READING