An updated description of the Australian dingo (Canis dingo Meyer, 1793)

@article{Crowther2014AnUD,
  title={An updated description of the Australian dingo (Canis dingo Meyer, 1793)},
  author={Mathew S. Crowther and Melanie Fillios and Nicholas J. Colman and Mike Letnic},
  journal={Journal of Zoology},
  year={2014},
  volume={293},
  pages={192-203}
}
A sound understanding of the taxonomy of threatened species is essential for setting conservation priorities and the development of management strategies. Hybridization is a threat to species conservation because it compromises the integrity of unique evolutionary lineages and can impair the ability of conservation managers to identify threatened taxa and achieve conservation targets. Australia’s largest land predator, the dingo Canis dingo, is a controversial taxon that is threatened by… 

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