An unusual supernova in the error box of the γ-ray burst of 25 April 1998

@article{Galama1998AnUS,
  title={An unusual supernova in the error box of the $\gamma$-ray burst of 25 April 1998},
  author={Titus J. Galama and Paul M. Vreeswijk and J. A. van Paradijs and Chryssa Kouveliotou and Thomas Augusteijn and Hermann B{\"o}hnhardt and James Philip Brewer and Vanessa Doublier and J.-F. Gonzalez and Bruno Leibundgut and Christopher E. Lidman and Olivier R. Hainaut and Ferdinando Patat and John Heise and Jean in 't Zand and Kevin Hurley and Paul J. Groot and Richard G. Strom and P. A. Mazzali and Koichi Iwamoto and Ken’ichi Nomoto and Hideyuki Umeda and Takuji Nakamura and Timothy R. Young and T. Suzuki and Toshikazu Shigeyama and Thomas M. Koshut and Marc Kippen and C. R. Robinson and Piet de Wildt and Ramj Wijers and Nial R. Tanvir and J. Greiner and E. Pian and Eliana Palazzi and Filippo Frontera and Nicola Masetti and Luciano Nicastro and Marco Feroci and Enrico Costa and Luigi Piro and B. A. Peterson and C. G. Tinney and Brian J. Boyle and Russell D. Cannon and Raylee A. Stathakis and Elaine M. Sadler and Michael C. Begam and Philip Anthony Ianna},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1998},
  volume={395},
  pages={670-672}
}
The discovery of afterglows associated with γ-ray bursts at X-ray, optical and radio wavelengths and the measurement of the redshifts of some of these events, has established that γ-ray bursts lie at extreme distances, making them the most powerful photon-emitters known in the Universe. Here we report the discovery of transient optical emission in the error box of the γ-ray burst GRB980425, the light curve of which was very different from that of previous optical afterglows associated with… Expand

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